Medical Advisory Board

Comprised of distinguished physicians, our Medical Advisory Board (MAB) members serve as strategic advisors to 98point6 and were chosen for their multidisciplinary expertise, thought-leadership and diverse geographic representation.

Dr. Jonathan Aviv

Author, Medical Inventor, Writer and Past Professor at Columbia University

Jonathan Aviv, MD, FACS is one of the leading authorities on the diagnosis and treatment of acid reflux disease, as well as the swallowing problems that can arise from underlying conditions such as stroke, cancer and chronic neurological diseases. He is the clinical director of the Voice and Swallowing Center at New York’s ENT and Allergy Associates, the largest ENT practice in the United States.


Among his many significant contributions to the field, Dr. Aviv is the inventor and developer of a medical device known as FEESST (Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing with Sensory Testing), a non-X-ray alternative to traditional swallowing tests. He also pioneered the TNE (TransNasal Esophagoscopy) procedure, which allows for unsedated examination of the esophagus.


Dr. Aviv’s name and face are familiar nationwide thanks to regular appearances on television’s Good Morning America, Inside Edition and Discovery Channel, in print outlets such as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and as a former regular contributor to the DrOz.com blog. He’s also authored the groundbreaking books The Acid Watcher Diet and Killing Me Softly From Inside. Dr. Aviv has held multiple posts at Columbia University, including director of the laryngology division and the Voice and Swallowing Center.

Dr. Fred Azar

Past President, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery

Frederick M. Azar, MD is one of the country’s top orthopaedic surgeons dedicated to advancing the field through groundbreaking discoveries in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. He is chief of staff at Campbell Clinic in Memphis, home to internationally recognized physicians and publisher of the world’s leading orthopaedic surgery text. Dr. Azar is also professor and director of the sports medicine fellowship program at the University of Tennessee.


Dr. Azar has been the head team physician for the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies since 2001, successfully managing the rehabilitation of its injured players as well as facilitating the orthopaedic needs of players from visiting teams. He additionally acts as team physician for the University of Memphis and Christian Brothers University sports teams.


Prior to his current position at the University of Tennessee, Dr. Azar served as director of its residency program for 10 years. Other career high notes include graduating from the inaugural American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Leadership Fellows Program in 2003. He was the first alumni of the program to become president of the AAOS in 2014.

Dr. Regina Benjamin

18th U.S. Surgeon General

Regina M. Benjamin, MD, MBA began her medical career serving the Gulf Coast fishing community of Bayou La Batre and grew from there to become the 18th Surgeon General of the United States. Today, she acts as CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic she founded, and chairs the public health sciences department at her alma mater, Xavier University.


Dr. Benjamin established her community clinic in 1990, allowing patients to pay what they could and funding a variety of expenses from her own pocket. She was beloved by patients and recognized as a model of perseverance for keeping the clinic in operation despite damage and destruction inflicted by Hurricanes Georges and Katrina. In 1995, she became the first physician under age 40 and the first African-American woman elected to the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. Seven years later, she made history again, becoming the first African-American female president of a state medical society in the United States.


In addition to owning the iconic role of “America’s Doctor” from 2009 to 2013, Dr. Benjamin has held notable positions such as chair of the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States and president of the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. Her humanitarian spirit has been acknowledged through countless awards, accolades and honorary degrees.

Dr. Jonathan Aviv

Author, Medical Inventor, Writer and Past Professor at Columbia University

Jonathan Aviv, MD, FACS is one of the leading authorities on the diagnosis and treatment of acid reflux disease, as well as the swallowing problems that can arise from underlying conditions such as stroke, cancer and chronic neurological diseases. He is the clinical director of the Voice and Swallowing Center at New York’s ENT and Allergy Associates, the largest ENT practice in the United States.


Among his many significant contributions to the field, Dr. Aviv is the inventor and developer of a medical device known as FEESST (Flexible Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing with Sensory Testing), a non-X-ray alternative to traditional swallowing tests. He also pioneered the TNE (TransNasal Esophagoscopy) procedure, which allows for unsedated examination of the esophagus.


Dr. Aviv’s name and face are familiar nationwide thanks to regular appearances on television’s Good Morning America, Inside Edition and Discovery Channel, in print outlets such as the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and as a former regular contributor to the DrOz.com blog. He’s also authored the groundbreaking books The Acid Watcher Diet and Killing Me Softly From Inside. Dr. Aviv has held multiple posts at Columbia University, including director of the laryngology division and the Voice and Swallowing Center.

Dr. Fred Azar

Past President, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgery

Frederick M. Azar, MD is one of the country’s top orthopaedic surgeons dedicated to advancing the field through groundbreaking discoveries in musculoskeletal medicine and surgery. He is chief of staff at Campbell Clinic in Memphis, home to internationally recognized physicians and publisher of the world’s leading orthopaedic surgery text. Dr. Azar is also professor and director of the sports medicine fellowship program at the University of Tennessee.


Dr. Azar has been the head team physician for the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies since 2001, successfully managing the rehabilitation of its injured players as well as facilitating the orthopaedic needs of players from visiting teams. He additionally acts as team physician for the University of Memphis and Christian Brothers University sports teams.


Prior to his current position at the University of Tennessee, Dr. Azar served as director of its residency program for 10 years. Other career high notes include graduating from the inaugural American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Leadership Fellows Program in 2003. He was the first alumni of the program to become president of the AAOS in 2014.

Dr. Regina Benjamin

18th U.S. Surgeon General

Regina M. Benjamin, MD, MBA began her medical career serving the Gulf Coast fishing community of Bayou La Batre and grew from there to become the 18th Surgeon General of the United States. Today, she acts as CEO of the Bayou La Batre Rural Health Clinic she founded, and chairs the public health sciences department at her alma mater, Xavier University.


Dr. Benjamin established her community clinic in 1990, allowing patients to pay what they could and funding a variety of expenses from her own pocket. She was beloved by patients and recognized as a model of perseverance for keeping the clinic in operation despite damage and destruction inflicted by Hurricanes Georges and Katrina. In 1995, she became the first physician under age 40 and the first African-American woman elected to the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. Seven years later, she made history again, becoming the first African-American female president of a state medical society in the United States.


In addition to owning the iconic role of “America’s Doctor” from 2009 to 2013, Dr. Benjamin has held notable positions such as chair of the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States and president of the American Medical Association Board of Trustees. Her humanitarian spirit has been acknowledged through countless awards, accolades and honorary degrees.

Dr. Frank Cockerill

Past Chief Medical Officer and Director of the Board of Analyte Health

Franklin R. Cockerill, III, MD, FACP, FACCP, FAAM, FIDSA is an internationally recognized microbiologist, known for his exceptional leadership, research and development skills. He most recently served as the chief medical officer and as a director of the board of Analyte Health, located in Chicago.


Prior to that, he served as the company’s CEO, a tenure in which he was awarded the “Ten Most Promising Telemedicine Solution Providers of 2017” distinction by Healthcare Tech Outlook, as well as the Halfpenny G-2 Lab Innovation Award for novel integration of laboratory services into the telehealth ecosystem.


Over the course of his extensive career, Dr. Cockerill was also endowed professor and chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, and president and CEO of Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). He is board-certified in internal medicine, infectious diseases and clinical microbiology, with research interests ranging from basic discovery to applied science, with a special emphasis on the phenotypic and genotypic identification of antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. Gayatri Devi

Neurologist and Nationally Recognized Memory Expert

Gayatri Devi, MD is a neurologist who has specialized in the early diagnosis and treatment of memory disorders related to aging and menopause for more than 20 years. Since 1999, she has led a premier center dedicated to neurologic wellness, education and research in New York City. She also currently serves as clinical associate professor at the New York University School of Medicine and as an attending physician at Lenox Hill Hospital.


Board-certified in neurology, with additional certifications in pain medicine, psychiatry and behavioral neurology, Dr. Devi’s unique background allows for a truly comprehensive approach to brain illness. A frequent presenter at national and international medical conferences, her current research focus is on neuromodulation in treating neurologic diseases including stroke, dementia and chronic pain.


As the author of seminal books about brain health, including Spectrum of Hope, A Calm Brain, and Estrogen, Memory and Menopause, Dr. Devi is a valued contributor for media outlets such as the BBC, CBS, the New York Times, NPR, TIME and the Wall Street Journal. She serves as neurological consultant to the New York State Committee for Physician Health and the National Football League Players Association.

Dr. Brian Hainline

Chief Medical Officer, NCAA

Brian Hainline, MD serves as chief medical officer of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, where he oversees the NCAA Sport Science Institute and its collaborative work with member institutions throughout the United States. He is vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology’s sports neurology section and a clinical professor at both New York University and Indiana University.


Highlights of his 30-year career include presiding as chief medical officer of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships and the United States Tennis Association. Prior to that, Dr. Hainline demonstrated his commitment to the field through countless roles including chair of the ITF Sport Science and Medicine Commission (providing guidance to 202 Olympic countries) and as a member of the ITF Wheelchair Tennis Medical Commission, where he wrote the rules of eligibility for international wheelchair competition.


Dr. Hainline has lectured around the world and authored or edited numerous works, including Drugs and the Athlete and Mind, Body and Sport: Understanding and Supporting Student-Athlete Mental Wellness. He is a founding member of the Tennis Anti-Doping Program Review Board for the ATP, ITF and WTA Tour, and has been pivotal in the rollout of athlete drug testing and education worldwide.

Dr. Frank Cockerill

Past Chief Medical Officer and Director of the Board of Analyte Health

Franklin R. Cockerill, III, MD, FACP, FACCP, FAAM, FIDSA is an internationally recognized microbiologist, known for his exceptional leadership, research and development skills. He most recently served as the chief medical officer and as a director of the board of Analyte Health, located in Chicago.


Prior to that, he served as the company’s CEO, a tenure in which he was awarded the “Ten Most Promising Telemedicine Solution Providers of 2017” distinction by Healthcare Tech Outlook, as well as the Halfpenny G-2 Lab Innovation Award for novel integration of laboratory services into the telehealth ecosystem.


Over the course of his extensive career, Dr. Cockerill was also endowed professor and chair of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, and president and CEO of Mayo Medical Laboratories (MML). He is board-certified in internal medicine, infectious diseases and clinical microbiology, with research interests ranging from basic discovery to applied science, with a special emphasis on the phenotypic and genotypic identification of antimicrobial resistance.

Dr. Gayatri Devi

Neurologist and Nationally Recognized Memory Expert

Gayatri Devi, MD is a neurologist who has specialized in the early diagnosis and treatment of memory disorders related to aging and menopause for more than 20 years. Since 1999, she has led a premier center dedicated to neurologic wellness, education and research in New York City. She also currently serves as clinical associate professor at the New York University School of Medicine and as an attending physician at Lenox Hill Hospital.


Board-certified in neurology, with additional certifications in pain medicine, psychiatry and behavioral neurology, Dr. Devi’s unique background allows for a truly comprehensive approach to brain illness. A frequent presenter at national and international medical conferences, her current research focus is on neuromodulation in treating neurologic diseases including stroke, dementia and chronic pain.


As the author of seminal books about brain health, including Spectrum of Hope, A Calm Brain, and Estrogen, Memory and Menopause, Dr. Devi is a valued contributor for media outlets such as the BBC, CBS, the New York Times, NPR, TIME and the Wall Street Journal. She serves as neurological consultant to the New York State Committee for Physician Health and the National Football League Players Association.

Dr. Brian Hainline

Chief Medical Officer, NCAA

Brian Hainline, MD serves as chief medical officer of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, where he oversees the NCAA Sport Science Institute and its collaborative work with member institutions throughout the United States. He is vice chair of the American Academy of Neurology’s sports neurology section and a clinical professor at both New York University and Indiana University.


Highlights of his 30-year career include presiding as chief medical officer of the U.S. Open Tennis Championships and the United States Tennis Association. Prior to that, Dr. Hainline demonstrated his commitment to the field through countless roles including chair of the ITF Sport Science and Medicine Commission (providing guidance to 202 Olympic countries) and as a member of the ITF Wheelchair Tennis Medical Commission, where he wrote the rules of eligibility for international wheelchair competition.


Dr. Hainline has lectured around the world and authored or edited numerous works, including Drugs and the Athlete and Mind, Body and Sport: Understanding and Supporting Student-Athlete Mental Wellness. He is a founding member of the Tennis Anti-Doping Program Review Board for the ATP, ITF and WTA Tour, and has been pivotal in the rollout of athlete drug testing and education worldwide.

Dr. Kim Harmon

Past President, American Society of Sports Medicine

Kimberly G. Harmon, MD is the section head of sports medicine at UW Medicine and a UW professor of family medicine, orthopedics and sports medicine. She has been a UW team physician since 1998, and currently serves as Head Football Team Physician while also covering Women’s Basketball.


Dr. Harmon’s dedication to sports medicine began in her undergraduate days at the University of Notre Dame, where she was a student athletic trainer and basketball player. Since then, she’s made a name for herself lecturing on a local, regional and national level, and through roles such as president of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine from 2009–2010.


In addition to her regular practice, Dr. Harmon presently serves on the medical advisory board for the NBA Players Association and the Nick of Time Foundation. She is an associate editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and consults for the NCAA and the U.S. Department of Defense. Her research interests include sudden cardiac death in athletes, the use of biologics such as platelet rich plasma in musculoskeletal medicine, concussions and sickle cell trait in athletes.

Dr. Byron Joyner

Vice Dean, University of Washington Medical School

Byron D. Joyner, MD, MPA is passionate about developing new ways to improve doctors and doctoring, and has been recognized internationally for his innovative contributions to medical education, professionalism and ethics. He currently serves as professor and vice dean at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and as an on-staff pediatric urologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital.


Prior to joining Seattle Children’s in 2001, Dr. Joyner served in the U.S. Army as chief of pediatric urology at Madigan Army Medical Center for four years. Following a research fellowship at the Boston Children’s Hospital in 1995, he trained for an additional two years in pediatric and reconstructive urology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. In 2009 he received a Masters in Public Administration, an experience that helped shape his principles of executive leadership in medical education.


Dr. Joyner’s fresh approach to teaching residents about interpersonal and communication skills earned him the University of Washington Julian S. Ansell Teaching Award in 2005. In addition to publishing more than 70 scientific articles over the course of his career, he has penned some of the seminal works for urology in the field of graduate medical education. Dr. Joyner also participated and assisted in the publication of the 2011 Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Atlanta Conference “Ensuring an Effective Physician Workforce for the United States.”

Dr. Mary Klotman

Dean, Duke University School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs

Mary E. Klotman, MD is a nationally recognized leader in academic medicine. She is presently dean of the Duke University School of Medicine, where she also acts as R.J. Reynolds Professor of Medicine, member of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and a professor of medicine, pathology and molecular genetics and microbiology.


Following early appointments at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Klotman began a 13-year tenure at New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1996. There, she oversaw a research program in HIV, served as chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and was co-director of Mount Sinai’s Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute. Since returning to her alma mater in 2010 as chair of the Department of Medicine, Dr. Klotman has directed its process improvement and faculty development, as well as the transition from a fee-for-service practice to a multidisciplinary one focused on population health.


In addition to her current responsibilities at Duke, Dr. Klotman serves as an associate editor of JCI and Annual Reviews of Medicine. A pioneering physician-scientist, her research is focused on the molecular pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and the potential delivery of an HIV vaccine.

Dr. Kim Harmon

Past President, American Society of Sports Medicine

Kimberly G. Harmon, MD is the section head of sports medicine at UW Medicine and a UW professor of family medicine, orthopedics and sports medicine. She has been a UW team physician since 1998, and currently serves as Head Football Team Physician while also covering Women’s Basketball.


Dr. Harmon’s dedication to sports medicine began in her undergraduate days at the University of Notre Dame, where she was a student athletic trainer and basketball player. Since then, she’s made a name for herself lecturing on a local, regional and national level, and through roles such as president of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine from 2009–2010.


In addition to her regular practice, Dr. Harmon presently serves on the medical advisory board for the NBA Players Association and the Nick of Time Foundation. She is an associate editor for the British Journal of Sports Medicine, and consults for the NCAA and the U.S. Department of Defense. Her research interests include sudden cardiac death in athletes, the use of biologics such as platelet rich plasma in musculoskeletal medicine, concussions and sickle cell trait in athletes.

Dr. Byron Joyner

Vice Dean, University of Washington Medical School

Byron D. Joyner, MD, MPA is passionate about developing new ways to improve doctors and doctoring, and has been recognized internationally for his innovative contributions to medical education, professionalism and ethics. He currently serves as professor and vice dean at the University of Washington School of Medicine, and as an on-staff pediatric urologist at Seattle Children’s Hospital.


Prior to joining Seattle Children’s in 2001, Dr. Joyner served in the U.S. Army as chief of pediatric urology at Madigan Army Medical Center for four years. Following a research fellowship at the Boston Children’s Hospital in 1995, he trained for an additional two years in pediatric and reconstructive urology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. In 2009 he received a Masters in Public Administration, an experience that helped shape his principles of executive leadership in medical education.


Dr. Joyner’s fresh approach to teaching residents about interpersonal and communication skills earned him the University of Washington Julian S. Ansell Teaching Award in 2005. In addition to publishing more than 70 scientific articles over the course of his career, he has penned some of the seminal works for urology in the field of graduate medical education. Dr. Joyner also participated and assisted in the publication of the 2011 Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation Atlanta Conference “Ensuring an Effective Physician Workforce for the United States.”

Dr. Mary Klotman

Dean, Duke University School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs

Mary E. Klotman, MD is a nationally recognized leader in academic medicine. She is presently dean of the Duke University School of Medicine, where she also acts as R.J. Reynolds Professor of Medicine, member of the Duke Human Vaccine Institute and a professor of medicine, pathology and molecular genetics and microbiology.


Following early appointments at the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Klotman began a 13-year tenure at New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine in 1996. There, she oversaw a research program in HIV, served as chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and was co-director of Mount Sinai’s Global Health and Emerging Pathogens Institute. Since returning to her alma mater in 2010 as chair of the Department of Medicine, Dr. Klotman has directed its process improvement and faculty development, as well as the transition from a fee-for-service practice to a multidisciplinary one focused on population health.


In addition to her current responsibilities at Duke, Dr. Klotman serves as an associate editor of JCI and Annual Reviews of Medicine. A pioneering physician-scientist, her research is focused on the molecular pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and the potential delivery of an HIV vaccine.

Dr. Paul Klotman

President, CEO and Executive Dean, Baylor College of Medicine

Paul E. Klotman, MD is as renowned for his research in molecular virology and AIDS pathogenesis as he is for revolutionizing the academic programs of revered institutions such as New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine and most recently, Houston’s Baylor College of Medicine. In his current role as president, CEO and executive dean at Baylor, he oversees the only private health science university in the Greater Southwest, with research funding of nearly $400 million.


Before he gained a reputation as a celebrated “turnaround artist,” Dr. Klotman served as associate professor at Duke University Medical Center, chief of molecular medicine at the National Institutes of Health and chief of the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory in the NIDR/NIH. In addition to training more than 50 clinical fellows, postdoctoral fellows and students since 1984, he was named Physician of the Year by Mount Sinai nurses during his tenure there.


Dr. Klotman is the author of more than 200 publications and has been a visiting professor and lecturer internationally in the field of HIV pathogenesis. He is on the editorial boards of journals both in the United States and in Europe, and has served on and chaired numerous study sections, including those from the NIH, the American Heart Association, the National Kidney Foundation and the VA research service. Dr. Klotman likewise serves on the scientific advisory boards of several biotech, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, and on the boards of several companies with interests in natural resources and conservation.

Dr. Clifford Ko

Director, American College of Surgeons Quality Improvement Program

Clifford Y. Ko, MD, MS, MSHA, FACS is one of the leading surgical health services researchers investigating quality measurement, process improvement and reliability.


He is presently director of research and patient care at the American College of Surgeons, where he oversees quality improvement programs such as the bariatric surgery and cancer accreditation programs, the trauma and pediatric surgery verification programs and the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Clinically, his practice focuses on colorectal cancer, and he serves as professor of health services at the UCLA School of Public Health. Current initiatives for Dr. Ko include overseeing the writing of the ACS quality manual and the development of a geriatric surgery quality program.


Dr. Ko has received millions of dollars in grant funding to study quality of care from multiple national agencies, including National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Cancer Society. In addition to advising national and international efforts in surgical quality for organizations such as the Institute of Medicine and the World Health Organization, he has published more than 275 manuscripts and written more than 20 book chapters.

Dr. Robert Krasner

Former Attending Physician to the U.S. Congress and Supreme Court

Robert C.J. Krasner, MD brings an extensive background as a consultant physician executive, having advised leaders of government and industry. He currently serves as clinical professor at New York University School of Medicine and as an adjunct professor at Cornell University Medical Center.


A Rear Admiral, Medical Corps, U.S. Navy (Ret.), Dr. Krasner was Attending Physician to Congress from 1986–1995. In addition to being responsible for the worldwide care of members of the Senate, House of Representatives and Supreme Court, he performed contingency planning for medical emergencies at the U.S. Capitol, joint sessions of Congress and presidential inaugurations. Dr. Krasner served in Ethiopia caring for Emperor Haile Selassie, at a submarine base in Sardinia, under three ambassadors at the American Embassy in London and as a tropical disease field and bench researcher in Panama and Indonesia. From 2001-2003 he was part of a presidential task force dedicated to improving care for veterans.


In recent years, Dr. Krasner has played a major role in the private sector as Medical Director for a top international holding company and as personal physician to members of the Forbes 400 and their families.

Dr. Paul Klotman

President, CEO and Executive Dean, Baylor College of Medicine

Paul E. Klotman, MD is as renowned for his research in molecular virology and AIDS pathogenesis as he is for revolutionizing the academic programs of revered institutions such as New York’s Mount Sinai School of Medicine and most recently, Houston’s Baylor College of Medicine. In his current role as president, CEO and executive dean at Baylor, he oversees the only private health science university in the Greater Southwest, with research funding of nearly $400 million.


Before he gained a reputation as a celebrated “turnaround artist,” Dr. Klotman served as associate professor at Duke University Medical Center, chief of molecular medicine at the National Institutes of Health and chief of the Viral Pathogenesis Laboratory in the NIDR/NIH. In addition to training more than 50 clinical fellows, postdoctoral fellows and students since 1984, he was named Physician of the Year by Mount Sinai nurses during his tenure there.


Dr. Klotman is the author of more than 200 publications and has been a visiting professor and lecturer internationally in the field of HIV pathogenesis. He is on the editorial boards of journals both in the United States and in Europe, and has served on and chaired numerous study sections, including those from the NIH, the American Heart Association, the National Kidney Foundation and the VA research service. Dr. Klotman likewise serves on the scientific advisory boards of several biotech, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies, and on the boards of several companies with interests in natural resources and conservation.

Dr. Clifford Ko

Director, American College of Surgeons Quality Improvement Program

Clifford Y. Ko, MD, MS, MSHA, FACS is one of the leading surgical health services researchers investigating quality measurement, process improvement and reliability.


He is presently director of research and patient care at the American College of Surgeons, where he oversees quality improvement programs such as the bariatric surgery and cancer accreditation programs, the trauma and pediatric surgery verification programs and the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. Clinically, his practice focuses on colorectal cancer, and he serves as professor of health services at the UCLA School of Public Health. Current initiatives for Dr. Ko include overseeing the writing of the ACS quality manual and the development of a geriatric surgery quality program.


Dr. Ko has received millions of dollars in grant funding to study quality of care from multiple national agencies, including National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Cancer Society. In addition to advising national and international efforts in surgical quality for organizations such as the Institute of Medicine and the World Health Organization, he has published more than 275 manuscripts and written more than 20 book chapters.

Dr. Robert Krasner

Former Attending Physician to the U.S. Congress and Supreme Court

Robert C.J. Krasner, MD brings an extensive background as a consultant physician executive, having advised leaders of government and industry. He currently serves as clinical professor at New York University School of Medicine and as an adjunct professor at Cornell University Medical Center.


A Rear Admiral, Medical Corps, U.S. Navy (Ret.), Dr. Krasner was Attending Physician to Congress from 1986–1995. In addition to being responsible for the worldwide care of members of the Senate, House of Representatives and Supreme Court, he performed contingency planning for medical emergencies at the U.S. Capitol, joint sessions of Congress and presidential inaugurations. Dr. Krasner served in Ethiopia caring for Emperor Haile Selassie, at a submarine base in Sardinia, under three ambassadors at the American Embassy in London and as a tropical disease field and bench researcher in Panama and Indonesia. From 2001-2003 he was part of a presidential task force dedicated to improving care for veterans.


In recent years, Dr. Krasner has played a major role in the private sector as Medical Director for a top international holding company and as personal physician to members of the Forbes 400 and their families.

Dr. Jennifer Mieres

Professor of Cardiology, Hofstra School of Medicine and Chief Diversity Officer, Northwell Health

Jennifer H. Mieres, MD, FACC, FAHA, MASNC is an internationally recognized expert and leading advocate for women's heart initiatives, wellness and diversity in healthcare. As an award-winning professor, author and media figure, she empowers women to take charge of their health through education and proactive partnerships.


For more than two decades, Dr. Mieres has focused on gender-specific cardiovascular research and raising awareness of a woman-centered holistic approach to heart health and wellness. She has shared her passion as a national spokesperson for the American Heart Association, as co-author of books including 2017’s Heart Smart for Women and through regular television appearances on programs such as Today Show, Good Morning America, and 20/20. In 2003, Dr. Mieres received an Emmy nomination for producing the PBS documentary, A Woman's Heart. She went on to serve as executive producer of Rx: The Quiet Revolution and Rx: Doctors of Tomorrow, a set of healthcare documentaries that aired on PBS in 2015.


Dr. Mieres continues to make a profound impact every day as leader of Northwell Health's Center for Equity of Care, where she oversees the Katz Institute for Women's Health and all of Northwell's health, wellness, community health education and healthcare access programs. Under her guidance as the organization's first Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, the institution has been recognized as a top employer for diversity and inclusion. She also currently serves on the faculty at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

Dr. Darin Portnoy

Past President, Doctors Without Borders USA

Darin A. Portnoy, MD, MPH is internationally known for his career-long commitment to medical humanitarian aid, and remains deeply interested in health and infectious disease issues affecting refugees and displaced people in crisis. He currently practices in Bronx, NY, while serving as an associate professor at the Albert Einstein School of Medicine and a professor with the family medicine residency program at Montefiore Medical Center.


Dr. Portnoy's early career took him to clinics and hospitals in rural Colorado and on Navajo Indian reservations in New Mexico. He joined MSF/Doctors Without Borders in 1997 as a field doctor and field coordinator for tuberculosis programs in Uzbekistan. Over the course of the next 10+ years, he ran cholera programs in El Salvador, coordinated emergency health care for Chechen refugees and worked throughout Africa—including multiple projects in South Sudan and Darfur. In 2014, he was featured in Bloomberg Businessweek for responding to the ebola crisis in Liberia.


Since 2011, Dr. Portnoy has been a member of MSF-USA's board of advisors. He also presently serves on the board of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative and on a committee for Human Rights Watch.

Dr. Ted Shortliffe

Pioneer of Biomedical Informatics, Senior Advisor to the College of Health Solutions

Edward (Ted) H. Shortliffe, MD, PhD, MACP, FACMI is a biomedical informatician, physician and computer scientist who is widely regarded as a pioneer in the use of artificial intelligence in medicine. He currently acts as a professor and senior advisor to the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State, serves as scholar-in-residence at the New York Academy of Medicine and holds adjunct positions at Columbia University and Weill Cornell Medical College.


In the 1970s, Dr. Shortliffe was the principal developer of the clinical expert system MYCIN, one of the first rule-based artificial intelligence expert systems used for diagnosis and treatment of severe infections. Because it preceded the era of local-area networking, it was never used in practice; however, its performance was shown to be comparable and sometimes more accurate than that of Stanford infectious disease faculty. This had a monumental influence on the subsequent development of computing in medicine.


Following a residency in internal medicine, Dr. Shortliffe joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and moved to Columbia University in 2000. He later served as founding dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He has written more than 300 articles and books in the fields of biomedical computing and artificial intelligence, including a major textbook, and is considered a founder of the field of biomedical informatics.

Dr. Jennifer Mieres

Professor of Cardiology, Hofstra School of Medicine and Chief Diversity Officer, Northwell Health

Jennifer H. Mieres, MD, FACC, FAHA, MASNC is an internationally recognized expert and leading advocate for women’s heart initiatives, wellness and diversity in healthcare. As an award-winning professor, author and media figure, she empowers women to take charge of their health through education and proactive partnerships.


For more than two decades, Dr. Mieres has focused on gender-specific cardiovascular research and raising awareness of a woman-centered holistic approach to heart health and wellness. She has shared her passion as a national spokesperson for the American Heart Association, as co-author of books including 2017’s Heart Smart for Women and through regular television appearances on programs such as Today Show, Good Morning America, and 20/20. In 2003, Dr. Mieres received an Emmy nomination for producing the PBS documentary, A Woman’s Heart. She went on to serve as executive producer of Rx: The Quiet Revolution and Rx: Doctors of Tomorrow, a set of healthcare documentaries that aired on PBS in 2015.


Dr. Mieres continues to make a profound impact every day as leader of Northwell Health’s Center for Equity of Care, where she oversees the Katz Institute for Women’s Health and all of Northwell’s health, wellness, community health education and healthcare access programs. Under her guidance as the organization’s first Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, the institution has been recognized as a top employer for diversity and inclusion. She also currently serves on the faculty at Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

Dr. Darin Portnoy

Past President, Doctors Without Borders USA

Darin A. Portnoy, MD, MPH is internationally known for his career-long commitment to medical humanitarian aid, and remains deeply interested in health and infectious disease issues affecting refugees and displaced people in crisis. He currently practices in Bronx, NY, while serving as an associate professor at the Albert Einstein School of Medicine and a professor with the family medicine residency program at Montefiore Medical Center.


Dr. Portnoy’s early career took him to clinics and hospitals in rural Colorado and on Navajo Indian reservations in New Mexico. He joined MSF/Doctors Without Borders in 1997 as a field doctor and field coordinator for tuberculosis programs in Uzbekistan. Over the course of the next 10+ years, he ran cholera programs in El Salvador, coordinated emergency health care for Chechen refugees and worked throughout Africa—including multiple projects in South Sudan and Darfur. In 2014, he was featured in Bloomberg Businessweek for responding to the ebola crisis in Liberia.


Since 2011, Dr. Portnoy has been a member of MSF-USA’s board of advisors. He also presently serves on the board of the Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative and on a committee for Human Rights Watch.

Dr. Ted Shortliffe

Pioneer of Biomedical Informatics, Senior Advisor to the College of Health Solutions

Edward (Ted) H. Shortliffe, MD, PhD, MACP, FACMI is a biomedical informatician, physician and computer scientist who is widely regarded as a pioneer in the use of artificial intelligence in medicine. He currently acts as a professor and senior advisor to the College of Health Solutions at Arizona State, serves as scholar-in-residence at the New York Academy of Medicine and holds adjunct positions at Columbia University and Weill Cornell Medical College.


In the 1970s, Dr. Shortliffe was the principal developer of the clinical expert system MYCIN, one of the first rule-based artificial intelligence expert systems used for diagnosis and treatment of severe infections. Because it preceded the era of local-area networking, it was never used in practice; however, its performance was shown to be comparable and sometimes more accurate than that of Stanford infectious disease faculty. This had a monumental influence on the subsequent development of computing in medicine.


Following a residency in internal medicine, Dr. Shortliffe joined the Stanford faculty in 1979 and moved to Columbia University in 2000. He later served as founding dean of the University of Arizona College of Medicine. He has written more than 300 articles and books in the fields of biomedical computing and artificial intelligence, including a major textbook, and is considered a founder of the field of biomedical informatics.

Dr. Ida Sim

Professor, Co-director of Biomedical Informatics UCSF and Co-founder of Open mHealth

Ida Sim, MD, PhD is a primary care physician, informatics researcher and entrepreneur. Her current research focuses on the use of mobile apps and sensors to improve health, manage disease and make clinical research faster and less expensive. She is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she co-directs biomedical informatics at UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.


As founding project coordinator of the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform in 2005, Dr. Sim led the establishment of the first global policy on clinical trial registration, defining the common 20-item trial registration data set that’s now adhered to by all registers worldwide. In 2011, she co-founded Open mHealth, a non-profit organization that creates open software architecture to support systematic and shared learning in mobile health.


Among her many present roles, Dr. Sim is a co-investigator and consortium core lead with the National Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (MD2K). She is also technical lead of the MRCT Framework for Data Sharing international effort towards building a single global portal for sharing individual participant-level data from clinical trials.

Dr. Ida Sim

Professor, Co-director of Biomedical Informatics UCSF and Co-founder of Open mHealth

Ida Sim, MD, PhD is a primary care physician, informatics researcher and entrepreneur. Her current research focuses on the use of mobile apps and sensors to improve health, manage disease and make clinical research faster and less expensive. She is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she co-directs biomedical informatics at UCSF’s Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.


As founding project coordinator of the World Health Organization’s International Clinical Trials Registry Platform in 2005, Dr. Sim led the establishment of the first global policy on clinical trial registration, defining the common 20-item trial registration data set that’s now adhered to by all registers worldwide. In 2011, she co-founded Open mHealth, a non-profit organization that creates open software architecture to support systematic and shared learning in mobile health.


Among her many present roles, Dr. Sim is a co-investigator and consortium core lead with the National Center of Excellence for Mobile Sensor Data-to-Knowledge (MD2K). She is also technical lead of the MRCT Framework for Data Sharing international effort towards building a single global portal for sharing individual participant-level data from clinical trials.